Customer Comments

Here's the latest comments from our customers, if you've got comments that you think would be useful for others to read, you can also make a comment on the individual product or blog page.

  1. Hadley Rich - Tuesday, 17 September 2019 on product Tilt Hydrometer And Thermometer - Yellow
    Yes they are :)
  2. Peter O'Regan - Tuesday, 17 September 2019 on product Tilt Hydrometer And Thermometer - Yellow
    Hi. Are your Tilts the latest v3 models? Thanks
  3. Peter O'Regan - Tuesday, 17 September 2019 on product Tilt Hydrometer And Thermometer - Yellow
    Hi. Are your Tilts the latest v3 models? Thanks
  4. Hadley Rich - Friday, 06 September 2019 on product Solid State Relay (SSR)
    Hi Jaco,

    Yes this one is AC, the 10A one is DC.

    Cheers
  5. Jaco - Thursday, 05 September 2019 on product Solid State Relay (SSR)
    Is this the 25A version? Just want to make sure as it is listed for cheaper than you 10A version
  6. Allen - Thursday, 15 August 2019 on product 5A 12A Switching Power Supply
    Dear Manager

    How are you? Wish good luck to you and your family, your business.
    You will be glad to know that our price is getting down now.(because of the USD exchange rate and product update)
    For example 12v 5a Wall mount type SAA RCM power adapter new price for 500PCS is 3.99USD/UNIT.

    Free samples could be provided.
    Any further questions,please do not hesitate to inform us.
    Thanks and best regards,
    Best regards.
    Allen
  7. Hadley Rich - Tuesday, 06 August 2019 on product 12V Solenoid Valve - 3/4"
    Hey Ed,

    Unfortunately not, just this one.

    Cheers
  8. Ed - Monday, 05 August 2019 on product 12V Solenoid Valve - 3/4"
    Have you got the normally closed one that is shown in the data sheet?
  9. Ansel - Wednesday, 31 July 2019 on blog post Building 100 Arduino Vacuum Pressure Gauges
    Hi Hadley, i'm very interested with this project. Where i can email you? Thanks
  10. Alan Devine - Tuesday, 30 July 2019 on product Platinum RTD Sensor - PT1000 - 3 Wire, 1 Meter
    Pity this is 4mm diameter, 30mm long. 3D printer standard is 3mm by 20mm.
  11. TvE - Tuesday, 30 July 2019 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    I just spent a bunch of hours trying to talk to my indoor unit (SEZ-KD09) and after banging my head against the wall I finally figured out the serial voltage thing...

    I turns out the TX of the unit is open-collector, which means that without some form of pull-up the esp8266/esp32/serial-dongle cannot receive what the unit is sending. The fact that it's OC is nice because it resolves the "is it 5v or does 3.3v work?" question. On a 3.3v microcontroller simply pull-up to 3.3v and you have a 3.3v level signal. Note that the esp8266/esp32 have an internal pull-up which can be enabled programatically.

    A tell-tale sign of all this is that without anything connected to the CN-105 cable the RX pin of the unit sits at 5V, which is due to its own pull-up, and the TX pin of the unit is at 0V, which is an unlikely state for an idle totem-pole serial output. So the TX of a 3.3V microcontroller can use a simple series shottky diode to protect it from the 5V pull-up (I didn't try to measure the pull-up resistor value).
  12. shweta - Friday, 26 July 2019 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    good knowledge provided about heat pump.......
    very much essential as well as effective.........
    good job.......
    thanks and keep sharing.......
  13. Hadley Rich - Monday, 22 July 2019 on product 2.1mm to 1.7mm DC Jack Adapter
    I'm not sure I understand the question? Does the image help? The male end is the 1.7mm
  14. Michael thomas - Friday, 19 July 2019 on product 2.1mm to 1.7mm DC Jack Adapter
    Hi does this turn a 1.7 mm into a 2.1mm dc point
  15. Jane Atkinson - Wednesday, 17 July 2019 on product PC Engines APU 1D4
    I've been using one of these for nearly three years as a wireless router, running Ubuntu server. It's been super-reliable.
  16. Louis - Wednesday, 10 July 2019 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi E,

    >why not just hack the remote control??

    If you hack/emulate the remote control, you'll be able to start/stop the heatpump, tell it to reach x temp, fan at y speed, etc, that's true. But you cannot know if the message reached it, and you cannot know which temp it senses in the room, and you also cannot know if somebody else changed the settings via the real remote. And finally (and more important for me) you cannot tell it to ignore it's temp sensor and use another data instead, which is really neat if you install a temp sensor in another room for example and you want THAT room to be 22 degrees instead of the air near the unit.

    Hope this makes sense!
  17. Hayden Perham - Monday, 08 July 2019 on product Frequency Generator Kit - FG085
    Hello,

    I require a FG085 or equivalent . Do you have any in stock and if so would i be able to pick this up. I see you are based in Timaru and i require something urgently.

    Thank you
  18. Hadley Rich - Saturday, 06 July 2019 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi E,

    The main reason I started this project instead of using the remote was to get feedback about the current state of the heatpump, closed loop control rather than open.

    Cheers,

    Hadley
  19. E - Saturday, 06 July 2019 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Howdy,

    Awesome info on controlling the mits mini split units via direct connection. Here’s the $1M question I have: why not just hack the remote control?? That was my first thought cuz they’re like $60 and you probably only need one to control many zones...

    Has anyone on this forum looked into that yet.

    Thanks,

    E
  20. E - Saturday, 06 July 2019 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Howdy,

    Awesome info on controlling the mits mini split units via direct connection. Here’s the $1M question I have: why not just hack the remote control?? That was my first thought cuz they’re like $60 and you probably only need one to control many zones...

    Has anyone on this forum looked into that yet.

    Thanks,

    E
  21. Louis - Thursday, 04 July 2019 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi Everyone,

    Posting this if it could help somebody. AL answered me via email, thanks AL!

    The setRemoteTemperature function in the SwiCago code (the c++ class) does set the current temp the unit must use to check if there is need to heat/cool the room and bypasses the internal sensor. To go back to the internal sensor, just set it to zero, and the mitsubishi will revert back to it's internal sensor to know the room temperature (not the setpoint, the actual room temp) and will then use this temperature to decide to heat/cool or not.

    So, in short, if you have a temp sensor somewhere else in the house (I put mine in a bedroom, that publishes it's readings to my MQTT broker) then the ESP8266 connected to the heatpump will invoke "setRemoteTemperature" with the readings of the bedroom sensor. If it cannot get a reading from the sensor (the sensor is offline, or the MQTT broker is offline) then it will send a zero through "setRemoteTemperature" and then the heatpump will use it's internal sensor instead. Disaster receovery!
  22. Louis - Thursday, 20 June 2019 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi AL,

    First of all, thanks for writing all the code and making public what you found about the mitsubishi mini-split. Thanks to all the others who added to the available info.

    I live in Canada, and had one installed this month (MSZ-GE15NA), and couldn't wait to tinker with it. So far an ESP01 is connected to it, and I can read the status, and then modify it (COOL, OFF, set temp, etc). It is wonderful.

    This got me thinking, because I don't think the internal temp sensor on the unit is that precise. First, it only gives readings in 1C increments, and then it does seem off compared to what I can verify from the room. I'll install a second ESP01 with a AM2301 temp/hum sensor and check, but I suspect I'll see wide variations, like the ones reported here in great detail (this is a good read, particularly the comments): https://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/question/mitsubishi-mini-split-behaving-ver...

    Then, I saw you included a setRemoteTemperature in the heatpump class in order to tell it to ignore the internal sensor. Wonderful! You wrote:

    >We discovered how to set remote temperature. This allows the user to have a temperature sensor in a diferent location than the heatpump. The heatpump will use that temperature value to determine if it has met the wanted temperature or not. This stays this way until a command to revert to internal temp sensors is sent.
    Remote temperature is good for ducted units, where attic temperatures do not match room temperatures

    This brings two questions for me:

    "This stays this way until a command to revert to internal temp sensors is sent". Do you know how to send this command? Do you know if there's a "I'm getting no updates since x time, so I'll revert back to internal sensor"? Can I just send a zero temp and it'll revert back to it's internal sensor? I'll need to test this, but maybe you already know.
    This brings us to the next question, how often should I update the remote temp? I'm thinking every minute or so would be plenty, and wouldn't overwhelm the serial interface.

    Again, thank you very much for publishing all the work, I really do appreciate it, it makes me think of the ham radio world where info is made public for everyone to tinker and enjoy.

    Louis (my name at c eler tec h dot ca)
  23. Ian Batterbee - Monday, 17 June 2019 on product ESP8266 10A 220V Network Relay WiFi Module
    Documentation for this board is available at https://ucexperiment.wordpress.com/2016/12/18/yunshan-esp8266-250v-15a-acdc-netw...
  24. William Taylor - Saturday, 15 June 2019 on product Adafruit Feather nRF52 Bluefruit LE - nRF52832
    I strongly warn against this device and in fact any device of the BLE variety.
    I purchased this device as I intended to use it in a low power consumption remote relay control system. However, even after several hours of working through documentation and example sketches I am no closer to being able to leverage the "power" of the BLE system, it's so far removed from what is now referred to as "Bluetooth Classic" that it might as well not exist as part of the standard.

    For starters, the Serial Port Protocol which previously allowed for basic string transmission using devices like the HC-05 has been removed, replaced with some bloated, higher level system which requires one to download an app onto their phone or computer, if there's no app for your platform, you're out of luck.
    Pairing is a complete nightmare, if indeed it exists at all. Devices using BLE seem to only operate in some open broadcast configuration devoid of security either by MAC validation or PIN entry. While there are references to ways to connect securly in various forums, most of the Nordic links 404.
    What was previously a low level, simple and elegant implementation of Bluetooth had been entirely bastardised into something that is simultaneously more complicated, less efficient and less feature rich than its predecessor. A single page Arduino sketch to achieve something on an HC-05 now becomes a multi source file document with several libraries, hours of headaches and resulting in a less elegant solution.

    Stay away.
  25. Louis - Thursday, 13 June 2019 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Thanks for publishing this information! From that and this link https://github.com/SwiCago/HeatPump I was able to do it too. Now, my mitsubishi heatpump is fully controllable via a MQTT server, like my home ventilation, pellet stove and garage door. Wonderful, thank you all!
  26. Heating and Cooling Spam - Saturday, 11 May 2019 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Love the article. And indeed reliability is mandatory in HVAC system.
  27. Hadley Rich - Tuesday, 07 May 2019 on product FTDI Cable 3.3V
    Hi Richard,

    Yep FTDI is a good option. I'll email you.

    Cheers,

    Hadley
  28. Richard Yates - Tuesday, 07 May 2019 on product FTDI Cable 3.3V
    Hi,
    We have a USB-To-RS232-TTL-USB-To-COM-Serial-Adapter-Cable-Module-PL2303HX-Converter/ cable that makes use of a prolific chip that is not compatible with windows 10. Would the FTDI 3.3v be a good replacement for this or can you suggest any other replacements that you may have in stock.

    Regards,

    Richard.
  29. James Freiwirth - Monday, 06 May 2019 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    I have made a PCB shield for the adafruit feather huzzah to make things a bit tidier. Thought someone else might enjoy.

    https://oshpark.com/shared_projects/TYN7wuVP

  30. Mantas - Friday, 29 March 2019 on product PM2.5 Sensor Module - Laser Sensing
    The same data on PM 2,5 and PM10 ? This item show wrong data or dont work right.
  31. Eric is a spammer - Wednesday, 27 March 2019 on product Grandstream GDS3710 RFID Coded Access Card
    Hello! I would like to contact with you about the Acces... Actually I'm a dirty spammer and my message has been deleted.
  32. Hadley Rich - Friday, 15 March 2019 on product Pi 3 Case Base - Clear
    Hi Keith,

    Looks like we'd missed that one, I've added it here:

    https://nicegear.nz/p/15339/

    Cheers,

    Hadley
  33. Keith - Thursday, 14 March 2019 on product Pi 3 Case Base - Clear
    Pi 3 Case Lid - Clear available also?

  34. Nick - Wednesday, 13 March 2019 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Thanks very much for this guide.

    A few issues I had:

    MSZ-GE35VAD unit

    1. Flashing lights
    I thought I had caused some damage installing the connection. The issue was that the lights flash when you have removed the vanes and the unit won't work until the vanes are re-installed.

    2. CN105 pinout
    I assumed the 2nd picture showing the pin-out was orientated as if looking at the board when you open the unit. I based this assumption on the 3rd picture, showing the cable plugged into CN105 - I thought the colours followed the computer convention of red = 5v, yellow = 12v (I tend to do this in my projects), black = ground. So I thought it was RX, TX, 5V, GND, 12V from left to right when looking at the board in the aircon. In fact it is 12V, GND, 5V, TX, RX (from left to right).
    Took me a while to work this out - I'd initially only hooked up 5V, but the LED on my micro was dim and I thought there must be insufficient supply and so hooked up 12V with a voltage converter - still no good. Eventually checked the pins with the multi-meter...

    Thanks again for working this whole thing out. Hopefully my experience can help someone else who runs into similar issues.
  35. Hadley Rich - Monday, 11 March 2019 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hey Ross,

    Thanks for commenting and great work on that, very well documented!

    Cheers,

    Hadley
  36. Ross Fowler - Saturday, 09 March 2019 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Many thanks for all the great work that you did on this project Hadley, it inspired me to do some similar work on a ducted Mitsubishi air conditioner that uses a different protocol via a CNB connector. Here’s the link https://github.com/roscoe81/Aircon-Controller
  37. Hadley Rich - Thursday, 07 March 2019 on product Adafruit Power Relay FeatherWing
    Hi Vimal,

    As of right now there is one in stock and more is around 10-14 days away. You can see the live stock levels on the product page above.

    Cheers,

    Hadley
  38. Vimal Prakash - Thursday, 07 March 2019 on product Adafruit Power Relay FeatherWing
    Hi Do you have this item in stock after 2 pic - Adafruit Power Relay FeatherWing
    Part Number -NG-14520
    Thanks
    Vimal Prakash
  39. Hadley Rich - Friday, 01 March 2019 on product Gigaset DECT Repeater
    Hi Sherma,

    Unfortunately we've no longer got this available.

    Cheers,

    Hadley
  40. sherma - Wednesday, 27 February 2019 on product Gigaset DECT Repeater
    do you have stock of this gigaset repeater ?
  41. Sherma - Tuesday, 26 February 2019 on product Gigaset DECT Repeater
    do you have stock of the gigaset repeater ?
  42. Colin de Jager - Tuesday, 12 February 2019 on product Conductive Nylon Fabric Tape - 5mm wide x 10m long
    Nylon Tape! Saved a precious child's toy carbon-tracked drum noise-maker; put tape along some tracks made it all better!
  43. Hadley Rich - Monday, 11 February 2019 on product Adafruit Flex Perma-Proto - Half-sized Breadboard Flex-PCB
    Cool, will throw them on our next shipment :)
  44. Rich Churcher - Sunday, 10 February 2019 on product Adafruit Flex Perma-Proto - Half-sized Breadboard Flex-PCB
    These are really handy... more please!
  45. Chris Nisbet - Friday, 01 February 2019 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    FYI - I've been doing a bit of work making my own application to control these heatpumps. It's written in C and I used SwiCago (https://github.com/SwiCago) code as a starting point.
    For various reasons, I wanted to read/write the settings using UBUS calls. That means it's a little bit more involved getting everything to build, but it's not too tricky.
    I'm not too sure what, if anything, I'll do with this, but the basic idea was to eventually put the app onto a raspberry pi, plonk an XBee on the top, install another XBee inside the heatpump, and go from there.
    I have the application running on my dev system (using a USB adaptor to the XBee), and it seems to work a treat. I was thinking of eventually connecting to multiple heatpumps using multiple XBees in API mode, but I'm not there yet.

    Note that it doesn't add any functionality as far as the protocol goes - It just supports the same sort of stuff that the SwiCago code does.
    Also note that I wasn't trying to keep the code tiny.
    Although controlled using UBUS calls, it shouldn't be that difficult to remove the UBUS support and use some other interface.
    Anyway, the code is here
    https://github.com/ChrisNisbet01/Mitsubishi_heatpump

    Required libraries (build/install these first)
    https://github.com/ChrisNisbet01/libubusgpio (to ease the pain of adding the UBUS support)
    libjson-c: https://github.com/json-c/json-c.git
    libubox: git://git.openwrt.org/project/libubox.git
    libubus: git://git.openwrt.org/project/ubus.git
    I don't remember having any great difficulty building/installing those libraries.

    If it's helpful to anybody, great. If it doesn't work for you, bummer.
  46. niclet - Wednesday, 30 January 2019 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hey, nice job :)
    Would you have some advice to open a SRK35ZMX-S ?
    Hope to find same kind of CN105 there.
    Thanks a lot.
    Niclet.
  47. Tim Albin - Wednesday, 16 January 2019 on blog post Building 100 Arduino Vacuum Pressure Gauges
    I am interested in either good information or one of these vacuum pressure sensors. Also do you have pressure sensors. Working on a project and need these or something like this.
  48. Rudi Schoors - Friday, 28 December 2018 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Okay Al, great I found it.
    Update it every minute is okay I guess?

    Thx!
    Rudi.
  49. AL - Sunday, 23 December 2018 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi Rude,
    Yes, you can use an external thermometer with my C library. In the library it is known as remote temperature.
    Cheers
    AL
    Swicago
  50. Rudi S - Friday, 21 December 2018 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi guys,

    Greetings from Belgium.
    I have successfully managed to implement Al's solution on 1 of the 3 of my units (2 MSZ-SF's and 1 MSZ-FH) by just using an ESP-01 and a 3.3v-5v level shifter.
    It is also working nicely in Home Assistant too!

    I have one question at the moment, is it possible to use an external thermometer rather that the internal one?

    Thanks for the great work!!

    Cheers,
    Rudi.