Customer Comments

Here's the latest comments from our customers, if you've got comments that you think would be useful for others to read, you can also make a comment on the individual product or blog page.

  1. Hadley Rich - Friday, 15 March 2019 on product Pi 3 Case Base - Clear
    Hi Keith,

    Looks like we'd missed that one, I've added it here:

    https://nicegear.nz/p/15339/

    Cheers,

    Hadley
  2. Keith - Thursday, 14 March 2019 on product Pi 3 Case Base - Clear
    Pi 3 Case Lid - Clear available also?

  3. Nick - Wednesday, 13 March 2019 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Thanks very much for this guide.

    A few issues I had:

    MSZ-GE35VAD unit

    1. Flashing lights
    I thought I had caused some damage installing the connection. The issue was that the lights flash when you have removed the vanes and the unit won't work until the vanes are re-installed.

    2. CN105 pinout
    I assumed the 2nd picture showing the pin-out was orientated as if looking at the board when you open the unit. I based this assumption on the 3rd picture, showing the cable plugged into CN105 - I thought the colours followed the computer convention of red = 5v, yellow = 12v (I tend to do this in my projects), black = ground. So I thought it was RX, TX, 5V, GND, 12V from left to right when looking at the board in the aircon. In fact it is 12V, GND, 5V, TX, RX (from left to right).
    Took me a while to work this out - I'd initially only hooked up 5V, but the LED on my micro was dim and I thought there must be insufficient supply and so hooked up 12V with a voltage converter - still no good. Eventually checked the pins with the multi-meter...

    Thanks again for working this whole thing out. Hopefully my experience can help someone else who runs into similar issues.
  4. Hadley Rich - Monday, 11 March 2019 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hey Ross,

    Thanks for commenting and great work on that, very well documented!

    Cheers,

    Hadley
  5. Ross Fowler - Saturday, 09 March 2019 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Many thanks for all the great work that you did on this project Hadley, it inspired me to do some similar work on a ducted Mitsubishi air conditioner that uses a different protocol via a CNB connector. Here’s the link https://github.com/roscoe81/Aircon-Controller
  6. Hadley Rich - Thursday, 07 March 2019 on product Adafruit Power Relay FeatherWing
    Hi Vimal,

    As of right now there is one in stock and more is around 10-14 days away. You can see the live stock levels on the product page above.

    Cheers,

    Hadley
  7. Vimal Prakash - Thursday, 07 March 2019 on product Adafruit Power Relay FeatherWing
    Hi Do you have this item in stock after 2 pic - Adafruit Power Relay FeatherWing
    Part Number -NG-14520
    Thanks
    Vimal Prakash
  8. Hadley Rich - Friday, 01 March 2019 on product Gigaset DECT Repeater
    Hi Sherma,

    Unfortunately we've no longer got this available.

    Cheers,

    Hadley
  9. sherma - Wednesday, 27 February 2019 on product Gigaset DECT Repeater
    do you have stock of this gigaset repeater ?
  10. Sherma - Tuesday, 26 February 2019 on product Gigaset DECT Repeater
    do you have stock of the gigaset repeater ?
  11. Colin de Jager - Tuesday, 12 February 2019 on product Conductive Nylon Fabric Tape - 5mm wide x 10m long
    Nylon Tape! Saved a precious child's toy carbon-tracked drum noise-maker; put tape along some tracks made it all better!
  12. Hadley Rich - Monday, 11 February 2019 on product Adafruit Flex Perma-Proto - Half-sized Breadboard Flex-PCB
    Cool, will throw them on our next shipment :)
  13. Rich Churcher - Sunday, 10 February 2019 on product Adafruit Flex Perma-Proto - Half-sized Breadboard Flex-PCB
    These are really handy... more please!
  14. Chris Nisbet - Friday, 01 February 2019 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    FYI - I've been doing a bit of work making my own application to control these heatpumps. It's written in C and I used SwiCago (https://github.com/SwiCago) code as a starting point.
    For various reasons, I wanted to read/write the settings using UBUS calls. That means it's a little bit more involved getting everything to build, but it's not too tricky.
    I'm not too sure what, if anything, I'll do with this, but the basic idea was to eventually put the app onto a raspberry pi, plonk an XBee on the top, install another XBee inside the heatpump, and go from there.
    I have the application running on my dev system (using a USB adaptor to the XBee), and it seems to work a treat. I was thinking of eventually connecting to multiple heatpumps using multiple XBees in API mode, but I'm not there yet.

    Note that it doesn't add any functionality as far as the protocol goes - It just supports the same sort of stuff that the SwiCago code does.
    Also note that I wasn't trying to keep the code tiny.
    Although controlled using UBUS calls, it shouldn't be that difficult to remove the UBUS support and use some other interface.
    Anyway, the code is here
    https://github.com/ChrisNisbet01/Mitsubishi_heatpump

    Required libraries (build/install these first)
    https://github.com/ChrisNisbet01/libubusgpio (to ease the pain of adding the UBUS support)
    libjson-c: https://github.com/json-c/json-c.git
    libubox: git://git.openwrt.org/project/libubox.git
    libubus: git://git.openwrt.org/project/ubus.git
    I don't remember having any great difficulty building/installing those libraries.

    If it's helpful to anybody, great. If it doesn't work for you, bummer.
  15. niclet - Wednesday, 30 January 2019 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hey, nice job :)
    Would you have some advice to open a SRK35ZMX-S ?
    Hope to find same kind of CN105 there.
    Thanks a lot.
    Niclet.
  16. Tim Albin - Wednesday, 16 January 2019 on blog post Building 100 Arduino Vacuum Pressure Gauges
    I am interested in either good information or one of these vacuum pressure sensors. Also do you have pressure sensors. Working on a project and need these or something like this.
  17. Rudi Schoors - Friday, 28 December 2018 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Okay Al, great I found it.
    Update it every minute is okay I guess?

    Thx!
    Rudi.
  18. AL - Sunday, 23 December 2018 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi Rude,
    Yes, you can use an external thermometer with my C library. In the library it is known as remote temperature.
    Cheers
    AL
    Swicago
  19. Rudi S - Friday, 21 December 2018 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi guys,

    Greetings from Belgium.
    I have successfully managed to implement Al's solution on 1 of the 3 of my units (2 MSZ-SF's and 1 MSZ-FH) by just using an ESP-01 and a 3.3v-5v level shifter.
    It is also working nicely in Home Assistant too!

    I have one question at the moment, is it possible to use an external thermometer rather that the internal one?

    Thanks for the great work!!

    Cheers,
    Rudi.
  20. Hadley Rich - Sunday, 16 December 2018 on product SiliconDust HDHomeRun Connect Quatro
    Hey Dion, yes that's the correct model. Cheers.
  21. Dion - Sunday, 16 December 2018 on product SiliconDust HDHomeRun Connect Quatro
    Hi there,

    What's the model number of this? Is it the HDHR5-4DTAU?

    Cheers.
  22. Egis - Monday, 10 December 2018 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi, seems Panasonic air-water heat pump has same connector, just different pin placment for rx tx and etc. I figured out all pins, tried to connect to my laptop ant monitor UART, but I doesnt get any data. Should I send some magic numbers to get communication working? Any hints how to figure out?
  23. Hadley Rich - Monday, 19 November 2018 on product SiliconDust HDHomeRun Connect
    Hi Aaron,

    Yes we will have stock of the new generation 5 version of the HDHomerun Connect Duo before christmas, probably in the next few weeks.

    In case you're wondering, there's no functional difference between the models so if you're wanting one then the generation 4 on this page is an excellent deal.

    Cheers,

    Hadley
  24. Aaron - Friday, 16 November 2018 on product SiliconDust HDHomeRun Connect
    Hi, do you have what seems to be the newer version of this, the Connect Duo?
    Cheers
    Aaron
  25. Hadley Rich - Wednesday, 24 October 2018 on product SiliconDust HDHomeRun Connect Quatro
    Hi Andrew,

    The HDHomeRun Connect Quatro is around 96mm square and 20mm thick. The antenna port does stick out of that 96mm a little.

    Cheers,

    Hadley
  26. Andrew - Wednesday, 24 October 2018 on product SiliconDust HDHomeRun Connect Quatro
    What are the dimensions of the HDHomeRun Quatro please?
  27. Islam Ahmed - Monday, 22 October 2018 on product RockBLOCK 9603 - Iridium SatComm Module
    Greetings,
    We are planning to add RockBLOCK 9603 - Iridium SatComm Module to one of our products. Currently we are still in the R&D stage and we need to purchase the module for testing.
    I was wondering if we need to prepare any licenses, certificates or forms before purchasing the module.
    I also would like to ask if there is any specific recommended external; SMA antenna to be used with the module?
    please advise
    looking forward to hearing from you soon

    best regards
  28. Vendel/ K2DSI - Friday, 19 October 2018 on blog post Using an I2C Real Time Clock (RTC) with a Raspberry Pi
    Oops, sorry about the double post, Vendel
  29. Vendel/ K2DSI - Friday, 19 October 2018 on blog post Using an I2C Real Time Clock (RTC) with a Raspberry Pi
    Hi, I'm running a Raspberry Pi 3b as a ham radio node/ repeater controller. It's running the Hamvoip Asterisk Arch Linux software. I'm trying to get my DS3231 RTC up and running with no success. I tried using the script from the following site...

    https://gist.github.com/grubernd/aed721614b36aaa31fd97ef5ab1ec6be

    when I run hwclock I get this...

    hwclock: Cannot access the Hardware Clock via any known method.
    hwclock: Use the --debug option to see the details of our search for an access method.

    The clock doesn't get detected. I tried your instructions. No luck. I can post the script and replies if that would help. I have two clocks and neither one works. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance, Vendel/ K2DSI.
  30. Vendel/ K2DSI - Friday, 19 October 2018 on blog post Using an I2C Real Time Clock (RTC) with a Raspberry Pi
    Hi, I'm running a Raspberry Pi 3b as a ham radio node/ repeater controller. It's running the Hamvoip Asterisk Arch Linux software. I'm trying to get my DS3231 RTC up and running with no success. I tried using the script from the following site...

    https://gist.github.com/grubernd/aed721614b36aaa31fd97ef5ab1ec6be

    when I run hwclock I get this...

    hwclock: Cannot access the Hardware Clock via any known method.
    hwclock: Use the --debug option to see the details of our search for an access method.

    The clock doesn't get detected. I tried your instructions. No luck. I can post the script and replies if that would help. I have two clocks and neither one works. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance, Vendel/ K2DSI.
  31. Hadley Rich - Monday, 15 October 2018 on product 12V Solenoid Valve - 3/4"
    Hi Travis,

    You could do that with an Arduino or similar, we're more set up with parts and things for people to build their own controllers and so don't have anything off the shelf that will do that unfortunately.

    Cheers,

    Hadley
  32. Travis Currie - Sunday, 14 October 2018 on product 12V Solenoid Valve - 3/4"
    Hey, I am looking to set up a misting system with this valve, and need a timer that will do seconds to go with it (about 15 seconds on-off, every 30 mins). What would you recommend?

    Cheers
    Travis
  33. Danny - Thursday, 11 October 2018 on blog post Get a real VoIP Conference Phone
    Polycom conference phones is one of the best phones
  34. Hadley Rich - Monday, 01 October 2018 on product SiliconDust TECH4-2DT
    Hi Dave,

    I'm not sure I follow what you're asking in relation to the HDHomerun tech?

    Cheers
  35. Hadley Rich - Monday, 01 October 2018 on product Adafruit PT100 RTD Temperature Sensor Amplifier - MAX31865
    Well, you didn't have to mount all the SMD components I assume. You forgot to quote the rest of the paragraph:

    "Each order comes with one assembled RTD amplifier breakout board. Also comes with two 2-pin terminal blocks (for connecting to the RTD sensor) and pin header (to plug into any breadboard or perfboard). A required PT100 RTD is not included! (But we stock them in the shop). Some soldering is required to solder the headers and terminal blocks to the breakout, but it's an easy task with soldering tools."
  36. Greg - Sunday, 30 September 2018 on product Adafruit PT100 RTD Temperature Sensor Amplifier - MAX31865
    "Each order comes with one assembled RTD amplifier breakout board"
    Absolute bollocks - comes in pieces - self-assembly required
  37. Dave - Saturday, 29 September 2018 on product SiliconDust TECH4-2DT
    Can you add an external IPTV channel via plex via ip address
  38. John M Clayton - Wednesday, 19 September 2018 on blog post Building 100 Arduino Vacuum Pressure Gauges
    Hello Hadley. I have researched this further and it WILL work for a NPWT vacuum pump for treating wounds. My Orthopedic surgeon, and other Doctors go on "missions" regularly and would Love several of these made. I would be happy to do this for them. I was wondering if you could post a link to your Eagle PCB files and also a link to the Arduino code you used? That would be extremely helpful so I would not have to re-invent the wheel you've so wonderfully already designed. After I have the boards made and soldered up, I will send a link to a picture of them and a write-up of the project they were used for. Also, the vacuum version of the sensor is MPXV5050VC6T1 and is made by NXP USA for about $10 each. With 0 kPa vacuum on th port, the signal out to the Arduino would be about 4.96 VDC. At -50 kPa that signal is about 4.95 VDC, so, it would be 90 mV per kPa! That makes the math in the Arduino sketch so easy! And, it can be output and easily displayed on a small OLED display. Also, just doing math in the sketch, the kPa can be converted to in Hg; mm Hg, or even PSI! the user would turn a rotary encoder to select what units they want the reading in and then use an up and a down push button to set the desired setpoint of the vacuum they would like to maintain.

    I figure if I used new Atmel chips and program as you did with bootloader and code copied from one prototype, it would be very quick to mass produce and the cost would be, roughly about $30 per board. That is amazing. The Doctor said he can find donors to buy the parts. Thank you for designing such a wonderful board!

    Kind Regards,
    John
  39. John Clayton - Saturday, 15 September 2018 on blog post Building 100 Arduino Vacuum Pressure Gauges
    I this is the vacuum version from DigiKey : https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/nxp-usa-inc/MPXV5050VC6T1/MPXV5050VC6T...
  40. John Clayton - Saturday, 15 September 2018 on blog post Building 100 Arduino Vacuum Pressure Gauges
    Sorry for the duplicate posts. I did not know they had shown up on your blog.
  41. John Clayton - Saturday, 15 September 2018 on blog post Building 100 Arduino Vacuum Pressure Gauges
    I am making a Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) vacuum pump. This Freescale MPXV5050 and arduino seems PERFECT? Do you offer these boards for sale? Maybe just the PCB and a bill of materials. I can solder components myself. I can take the output of the pressure sensor to an Arduino Nano analog input and, in the code, provide an on-off output signal to turn a vacuum pump on and off at a specific vacuum level.

    Currently available NPWT pumps cost over $2,000!!! I had one rented from a medical supply house and an 18 inch long incision was healed completely in less than 4 weeks! I had a hip replacement. I would LOVE to make these for instances where war or other major catastrophes can help injured people heal faster.
    One question... if the Freescale MPXV5050 is a PRESSURE sensor, does it also register NEGATIVE pressure (vacuum)? Typically a NPWT pump is set to around -110 mmHg (or -.146 BAR or -2.127 PSI). Thanks for any help! email me if you post your answer here on your blog mankey1960@gmail.com
  42. John Clayton - Saturday, 15 September 2018 on blog post Building 100 Arduino Vacuum Pressure Gauges
    I am making a Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) vacuum pump. This Freescale MPXV5050 and arduino seems PERFECT? Do you offer these boards for sale? Maybe just the PCB and a bill of materials. I can solder components myself. I can take the output of the pressure sensor to an Arduino Nano analog input and, in the code, provide an on-off output signal to turn a vacuum pump on and off at a specific vacuum level.

    Currently available NPWT pumps cost over $2,000!!! I had one rented from a medical supply house and an 18 inch long incision was healed completely in less than 4 weeks! I had a hip replacement. I would LOVE to make these for instances where war or other major catastrophes can help injured people heal faster.
    One question... if the Freescale MPXV5050 is a PRESSURE sensor, does it also register NEGATIVE pressure (vacuum)? Typically a NPWT pump is set to around -110 mmHg (or -.146 BAR or -2.127 PSI). Thanks for any help! email me if you post your answer here on your blog mankey1960@gmail.com
  43. Hadley Rich - Thursday, 13 September 2018 on product Adafruit Ultimate GPS FeatherWing
    Hey Dean,

    No worries, looks like they should be here today or tomorrow.

    Cheers,

    Hadley :)
  44. Dean Ashby - Thursday, 13 September 2018 on product Adafruit Ultimate GPS FeatherWing
    Hi Hadley,

    Sorry, I'm being impatient, just curious how far away the Adafruit Ultimate GPS FeatherWings are? I've got a shopping basket full of goodies just waiting on this item to come back into stock.

    Cheers,

    Dean
  45. Lorenzo Decaria - Tuesday, 11 September 2018 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hey, this is an awesome content! Where can I find a CN105 connector though?

    Thanks!
  46. Daniel - Thursday, 06 September 2018 on product LIDAR-Lite v3
    How well do these perform in a dusty environment?
  47. Hadley Rich - Thursday, 06 September 2018 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi Jonathan,

    I don't unfortunately, they're used as some multi cell lipo balance charger cables which is probably the easiest place to get them.

    The prototype you can see has the cable coming from the JST cable which is everything, power and comms from the Mitsi.

    Cheers,

    Hadley
  48. Jonathan - Thursday, 06 September 2018 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Do you still have some "JST PA series" connectors available?
    And what is the black connector on the prototyping board with the red, yellow, green, blue cables?
  49. Daniel - Wednesday, 05 September 2018 on product LIDAR-Lite v3
    How well do these perform in a dusty environment?
  50. SVZ Guy - Wednesday, 29 August 2018 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    OK, I got it to work now.

    For anyone reading this who wants to make this work with a NodeMCU, you need a logic level shifter. A voltage regulator as seen in the schematics on the github site is not needed though. The NodeMCU has its own voltage regulator. I provide the 5V from the heatpump to the VIN on the NodeMCU and it is automatically stepped down to 3.3V for the serial input (RXD) and output (TXD). from there I run these to the 3.3V side of the logic level shifter. I bought one online that has 4 channels (using two of them). You need to provide 3.3V (from the NodeMCU), 5V (from the heatpump) and GRND. I still used the pullup resistor on the 5V side of it. Hope this helps.